skip to Main Content

Sophomores deepen faith through class retreat

Last week, the sophomores joined together in a class retreat led by NET Ministries. The day included games, small group discussions, witness testimonies, dramas, and time for reflection and prayer. The students enjoyed the opportunity to deepen their faith life and draw closer together as a class.

Sophomore Erin Popson said she enjoyed how the ministry team started the day off by sharing their “heightened energy” and quickly helped everyone feel comfortable sharing about their faith.

“My fellow students shared stories of their religious struggles without hesitation, and this was especially apparent when we were granted the chance to give special petitions to the NET members,” Erin said. “The doorway was flooded with people my age wanting to pray in mere minutes. It was truly an experience that brought us all closer together.”

Sophomore Kyle Netter said he most enjoyed the small group faith discussions and the opportunity to speak with each other about faith experiences.

“This really helped everyone in the group deepen their faith,” Kyle said. “I think that is because the information is not just coming from a leader that they do not know, but they can hear it from classmates and can converse about everything they are learning from the day.”

Sophomore Margaret Gahagen said her favorite part of the retreat was visiting the prayer stations.
“It was so powerful, and I feel like I was really close to God during that,” Margaret said. “It was a really special feeling.”

Margaret added that she feels grateful to be able to attend a school where faith experiences like their class retreat can take place. She also is glad for the experience to boost her personal faith life.

“The thing I will take away most from retreat is to just always trust that things will work out for the best if we trust in God’s plan for us,” Margaret said. “Before retreat, I felt a little shaky in whether I was doing the right thing or not, but I already feel so much stronger. I am very grateful for retreat. It realigned me with God.”

Thank you for reading the eVision. If you would like to receive the twice-monthly publication in your inbox, sign up here.

November Scholars named in 4 subjects

This month, 15 students have been recognized for their outstanding work in the classroom and have been named November Scholars. These students demonstrated a noteworthy performance on a test, presentation, quiz, or homework; exemplary participation and input in class discussion; superb peer leadership by assisting classmates with homework, new concepts, and so on; modeling Christian principles, or living the Providence Mission. The students recognized this month include:

  • English: freshman Leah Stapp, sophomore Erin Popson, junior Ainsley Wilt, senior Carley Wright
  • Math: freshman Osvaldo Flores, sophomore Iza Smith, junior Alex Kemp, and senior Allison Mercer
  • Social Studies: sophomore Sawyer Elias, junior Abby Adams, and senior David Wade
  • Theology: freshman Michelle Landeros-Mendez, sophomore Connor Sad, junior Ben Kelly, and senior Autumn Grantz

Read on for a Q&A with these students:

Leah Stapp, freshman, English 9, House of Faith, Girls Basketball manager

Question: What do you like about your English class?
Leah Stapp: I like my English class because Mrs. Beyl is very organized and put together to the point we always know what to do when we get into the classroom.

Q: Which is your favorite: nonfiction, fiction, reading, writing, speech, or creative writing?
LS: My favorite is reading because I’ve always been a big reader, and I love the books and short stories Mrs. Beyl has picked out for us so far.

Q: What has been your favorite English assignment so far?
LS: My favorite English assignment so far has been our personal narrative short story. We were given the assignment to write about something really important in our life, and I love to free write about anything.

Q: What have you learned in your English class(es) that you have used outside of school?
LS: Something I have learned in English class that I used outside of school would be our vocabulary words. My mom was talking to me and described something with one of our vocab words we learned a while before and I didn’t have to ask what it meant.

Erin Popson, sophomore, Honors English 10, House of Courage Sophomore Delegate, Honor Council, Pro-Life Club, Providence Singers, and Theatre

Question: What do you like about your English class?
Erin Popson: I really enjoy the environment. My teacher, Mrs. Bentley, is always open to discussion, and she truly has a passion for every lesson she teaches. She especially is strong in her faith, praying at the beginning of every class and allowing us to speak freely about personal morals when deeper subjects come up in our reading and writing. Overall, we are always pushed to do better in everything we do—inside and outside of the classroom.

Q: Which is your favorite and why: nonfiction, fiction, reading, writing, speech, creative writing?
EP: Reading-wise I love discovering new worlds through fiction. It’s as if with a single story, a whole new way of thinking can be incorporated into my life. I also enjoy the writing aspect of my English classes, though, because it allows me to do the same thing that these writers do and inspire readers with new knowledge.

Q: What has been your favorite English assignment so far?
EP: When our class read Frankenstein freshman year, we did a project to review the book before our test. The assignment was to create news articles that would cover the entire book, but my group asked for permission to make it into a news cast. It was so fun to add a modern twist to a classic novel!

Q: What have you learned in your English class that you have used outside of school?
EP: We have covered a lot of topics in my English class. Most of them pertain to not only literature and language but to the real world. Many great lessons have come from this way of studying, including 1) respect of others’ opinions and 2) clear communication and discussion. With these ideas in mind, our class has been able to choose opposing sides of arguments about modern problems that come up in our reading and writing without forceful debate. It’s really helped me grow in my own opinions and openness to those that my fellow students—and people outside of school—may have, even if it means we are contradicting

Ainsley Wilt, junior, English 11, House of Spirit, Theatre. Outside of school: actor, film creator, and model

Question: What do you like about your English class?
Ainsley Wilt: My favorite thing about my English class is the engagement Mrs. Miller provides. She keeps the class involved and gives us activities to help us grasp each topic.

Q: Which is your favorite: nonfiction, fiction, reading, writing, speech, creative writing?
AW: Reading is my favorite activity because it allows me to learn as much as possible. Books contain knowledge from those before us. Reading is not only something I enjoy, but it also allows me to take advantage of that knowledge and apply it to my life.

Q: What has been your favorite English assignment so far?
AW: My favorite English assignment so far is the creative writing project. I got to talk about something I was really interested in, and it was very enjoyable for me.

Q: What have you learned in your English class that you have used outside of school?
AW: A lesson I have learned in English is from The Crucible — that is to stay true to yourself no matter what and to take ownership of your mistakes.

Carley Wright, senior, English 12, Communications, House of Courage

Question: What do you like about your English classes?
Carley Wright: In my English class I like how the teacher let us pick the genre of our independent reading. It is really difficult for me to pay attention to something I’m not interested in, so being able to choose what I want to read lets me be more attentive and excited to read. Also, I enjoy what we are reading in class at the moment, which is the Canterbury Tales. It’s different from what I usually read and keeps me wanting to learn more about the other tales of each person. 

Q: Which is your favorite: nonfiction, fiction, reading, writing, speech, or creative writing?
CW: My favorite genre to read is fiction because it allows authors to be creative and clever with their writing and to be able to explore their mind and try to find new ways to entertain their readers.

Q: What has been your favorite English assignment so far?
CW: My favorite assignment so far is to read one of the Canterbury Tales: The Pardoner’s Tale. It’s a story about three rioters looking for Death due to the plague taking the life of their friend. Instead of death they find gold, which leads to the moral of the story that greed is the root to all evil. I liked this assignment because it was an ironic story and a fun read.  

Q: What have you learned in your English classes that you have used outside of school?
CW: I have used critical thinking and using my own opinion to analyze readings and come to my own conclusions, to be able to think for myself and observe.

Math

Osvaldo Flores, freshman, Honors Geometry, House of Truth, Spanish Club

Question: What do you like about your math class?
Osvaldo Flores: I like the atmosphere of the class and the subjects that we learn.

Q: What has been your favorite math class so far?
OF: My favorite math class is geometry because it has been challenging me to do my best.

Q: What has been your favorite math assignment so far?
OF: Probably my favorite assignments have to be angles and parallel lines worksheets just because of how great it felt solving for x, especially the questions with a bunch of angles.

Q: What have you learned in your math class that you have used outside of school?
OF: I have been able to use everything that I have learned in my math class to help with my siblings’ homework

Q: Have any of your math classes influenced your future career?
OF: My math class has opened a lot more career choices for me to consider, like engineering.

Iza Smith, sophomore, Honors Geometry, Honors Algebra II, House of Loyalty sophomore delegate, Girls Golf, Tech Theatre

Question: What do you like about your math classes?
Iza Smith: The thing I like most about my math classes are the fun teachers and helpful classmates.

Q: What has been your favorite math class so far?
IS: My favorite math class has been Honors Algebra II because Mr. Book is a great teacher, and I prefer algebra over geometry.

Q: What has been your favorite math assignment so far?
IS: My favorite math assignments are when we get into groups and do scavenger hunts and puzzles.

Q: What have you learned in your math class(es) that you have used outside of school?
IS: In my math classes I’ve learned how to better work with others and problem solve, not just with math, but with real-life problems.

Q: Have any of your math classes influenced your future career goals
IS: Yes, I want to be an optometrist, but after my math classes I’ve thought about being an algebra teacher.

Alex Kemp, junior, Honors PreCalculus & Trigonometry, House of Humility, Boys Tennis, Student Ambassador

Question: What do you like about your math classes?
Alex Kemp: I enjoy the sense of problem solving in math. Being able to use everything you’ve learned and be able to work out a problem and get the correct answer is very enjoyable and makes you feel accomplished.

Q: What has been your favorite math class so far?
AK: My favorite math class has been Honors Algebra II. I really enjoyed this class, and Mr. Book was able to teach it in a very engaging and fun way, that made it easy to pay attention and learn. I enjoyed the satisfying math that came along with Algebra, also.

Q: What has been your favorite math assignment so far?
AK: My favorite math assignment has been factoring projects in Algebra. These projects were always fun and were able to make math fun. Factoring is satisfying and calming to be able to solve and figure out.

Q: What have you learned in your math class(es) that you have used outside of school?
AK: I have learned how important it is to pay attention to even the smallest of details, and that they can have a large impact, both in real life and in math.

Q: Have any of your math classes influenced your future career goals?
AK: Yes, due to these classes I have pushed myself to want to advance in the math field and am considering majoring in business or engineering.

Allison Mercer, senior, Honors PreCalculus & Trigonometry, House of Courage senior leader, Student Ambassador, National Honor Society tutor, and Senior Executive Advisory Council

Question: What do you like about your math classes?
Allison Mercer: I like the fact that math classes require me to work with numbers because working with numbers just makes sense to me.

Q: What has been your favorite math class so far?
AM: My favorite math class so far has been pre-cal, because it’s new material that I get to learn. It also helps me a lot in physics.

Q: What has been your favorite math assignment so far?
AM: My favorite math assignments are Khan Academy lessons because they’re typically pretty easy but still help me learn the topic.

Q: What have you learned in your math class(es) that you have used outside of school?
AM: Math classes have taught me how to tip, estimate money in the bank, and much more. These skills will stay with me for the rest of my life.

Q: Have any of your math classes influenced your future career goals?
AM: My math classes, specifically pre-cal, will help me for my college math classes that I need to take. I want to be a doctor and the prerequisites for medical school include calculus, physics, and chemistry, which all require high level math skills.

Social Studies

Sawyer Elias, sophomore, AP U.S. History, House of Justice, Theatre

Question: What do you like about your Social Studies class?
Sawyer Elias: I like that we often work together to understand a topic. Mrs. Harritt is really good at explaining things in different ways, such as games and group debates.

Q: What do you enjoy about taking challenging AP social studies classes?
SE: I like the challenge of an AP class. It helps me get credits for college. I really like the setup of an AP class, since I often get lost if we stay on one topic for too long.

Q: What has been your favorite social studies class so far?
SE: My favorite social studies class so far has been the class where we played a game where one person was facing the board and the other facing away. We had to give the person facing away clues to help them guess the keyword on the board.

Q: What have you learned in your social studies class(es) that you have used outside of school?
SE: In my social studies class, I’ve learned how to answer questions better. Mrs. Harritt is really good at teaching different techniques for test taking and how to thoroughly answer a question.

Abigail Adams, junior, AP World History, House of Faith, Art Club, Drawing Club, Theatre, and Student Ambassador

Question: What do you like about your Social Studies class(es)?
Abigail Adams: For one, I love my teacher, Mrs. Harritt, and I love her teaching style. She teaches in a way that is easy for me to understand the subject better.

Q: What do you enjoy about taking challenging AP social studies classes?
AA: I have taken AP US History, and I’m currently taking AP World History. I enjoy taking the AP classes because they’re able to challenge my pre-existing understanding of history.

Q: What has been your favorite social studies class so far?
AA: My favorite social studies class so far has probably been AP World. I really enjoy learning about how the world grew together and how each country created history in our world.

Q: What has been your favorite social studies project so far?
AA: My favorite project so far in AP World was a project where we had to do an Autopsy of an Empire and really learn about the empire and how it thrived.

Q: What have you learned in your social studies class(es) that you have used outside of school?
AA: Just general knowledge of history has allowed me to be able to realize what we need to do to be better to not repeat the bad events in history.

Q: Have any of your social studies classes influenced your future career goals?
AA: My history classes since being at Providence have made me consider becoming a history teacher in the future.

David Wade, senior, AP Government, Ivy Tech Psychology, House of Integrity, Boys Soccer, National Honor Society

Question: What do you like about your Social Studies class(es)?
David Wade: I like how we learn to apply what has happened in the past to what is happening currently. You’d be surprised at the amount of things that are similar between the past and present.

Q: What do you enjoy about taking challenging AP social studies classes?
DW: I have taken all AP social studies classes. I believe that it has helped me become a better student by challenging me to be better than what I had been previously.

Q: What has been your favorite social studies class so far?
DW: My favorite social studies class so far has been AP Gov. This is because I really like what we’re learning about, and I really like the way we’ve been going about learning it.

Q: What has been your favorite social studies project so far?
DW: My favorite project is the fantasy Congress project we’ve been doing currently. It’s a good mix between fun and learning about congressional representatives, plus the winners get extra credit.

Q: What have you learned in your social studies class(es) that you have used outside of school?
DW: I have learned how to write many essays until time limitations, and that has greatly helped me speed up my essay writing progress. This helps with essay-based assignments, so I can finish them quickly.

Theology

Connor Sad, sophomore, Paschal Mystery, House of Courage, Football, Wrestling

Question: What do you like about Theology class?
Connor Sad: What I like most about theology class is Mr. Loner’s teaching approach, and I enjoy the way he tries to keep everyone in the class involved in the lesson.

Q: What does it take to excel in Theology class?
CS: To excel in theology class, you have to pay attention and take notes to understand what is going on.

Q: How has what you’ve learned in Theology class helped you in other areas?
CS: What I have learned in theology class that has helped me in other areas is to have detailed note taking.

Q: What has been your favorite assignment/project in Theology class and why?
CS: My favorite assignment in theology class so far has been the archangels assignment. It really helped me gain a better understanding of the roles and what the angels are known for.

Autumn Grantz, senior, History of the Catholic Church, House of Spirit, National Honor Society, Green Dot Club

Question: What do you like about Theology class?
Autumn Grantz: What I like about Theology class is being able to more deeply understand the religion I’ve grown up with my entire life. Being able to learn about the history, how other religions connect to Catholicism, and the blessings that God gives us every day is something I truly love learning about.

Q: Which is your favorite: prayer, social justice, service, religious history, Catholic teachings, general theology?
AG: My favorite aspect of theology is prayer because it is how we communicate with God. We can share our thoughts and feeling with him, our fears and successes, our hopes and desires, and our thankfulness for God’s love, miracles, and sacrifices.

Q: What does it take to excel in Theology class?
AG: To excel in Theology class, one needs to think about why we have this class at Providence in the first place. We are able to learn about our God and all that He has done for us. Looking into one’s own life and how God is present has helped me more easily understand the lessons we learn in theology.

Q: How has what you’ve learned in Theology class helped you in other areas?
AG: Learning about God’s support and encouragement for me to do what is right, put in maximum effort into all my activities, and to turn to Him in times of stress has been extremely helpful. If I’m worried about a test in another class, I know I can turn to God because my religion teachers have taught me the importance of laying our stress at God’s feet. He takes care of us and wants what is best for us!

Thank you for reading the eVision. If you would like to receive the twice-monthly publication in your inbox, sign up here.

Sports Spotlight: Girls Basketball

This Sport Spotlight is on Girls Basketball. Coach Brad Burden nominated sophomore guard Grace Denis and junior center Hailey Crisp. Of Grace, Coach Burden said, “Grace has made the transition from JV to varsity this year, and through her hard work is emerging as one of our go to players with her shooting ability.” Of Hailey, he said, “Hailey has battled through an injury this year and has overcome a lot to be a major factor for us on and off the court.”

Read on for a Q&A with these players:

Grace Denis, sophomore, guard, second season/first at varsity, sixth year overall; House of Justice, Softball

Question: How did you get started playing basketball?
Grace Denis: I used to shoot around outside with my dad and brother when I was younger then decided to play for school. When I decided I liked it, I joined the Providence Academy team, which led up to me playing in high school.

Q: Coach Burden nominated each of you for your hard work, either in overcoming injury or moving up to varsity. What inspires you to put in the effort to improve your game or overcome injury?
GD: Knowing we are a young team inspires me to work harder because we all have to work harder for the future.

Q: What do you enjoy about PHS Girls Basketball?
GD: I enjoy being able to play with all my teammates and friends because a lot of us have played academy league with each other since middle school. So I enjoying playing with them and knowing I get to play more years with them.

Q: What are you looking forward to this season?
GD: Something I am looking forward to in the season is just seeing how we do at the end of the season and seeing all our work from the beginning to the end.

Q: What is a fun tradition the Girls Basketball team does that you look forward to continuing?
GD: A tradition I am looking forward to is going to Vincennes Camp with my team. It is a fun time playing games all day and hanging out with each other between games.

Hailey Crisp, junior, center, third season, 11th overall; House of Loyalty junior leader, Softball, Student Ambassador, Green Dot Club

Question: Coach Burden nominated each of you for your hard work, either in overcoming injury or moving up to varsity. What inspires you to put in the effort to improve your game or overcome injury?
Hailey Crisp: What inspires me is wanting to be a better player than what I was the day before — that could be by knowledge of the game, working hard to overcome injuries to get back to being the best player I can be, or just being a good teammate and helping them to be the best they can be as well.

Q: What is your favorite part about being a Pioneer?
HC: My favorite part about being a Pioneer is hands down the family atmosphere and how everybody lifts each other up and knows almost everyone personally.

Q: What do you enjoy about PHS Girls Basketball?
HC: PHS Girls Basketball is great about leadership and working together as one. I’ve enjoyed learning from the players before me and being a leader for the underclassmen who might have been nervous coming in and being someone they can talk to. Also being able to go out a see other schools and the differences between ours and theirs is very cool to see.

Q: What do you enjoy about playing basketball in general?
HC: My favorite thing about playing basketball is the sheer joy it brings me, including being able to step on the court and help my teammates win and seeing the joy on our faces when we succeed and being able to be a leader and work together for a common goal.

Thank you for reading the eVision. If you would like to receive the twice-monthly publication in your inbox, sign up here.

Four receive Gala Awards of Distinction

Providence bestowed its Awards of Distinction during the 70th Anniversary Gala earlier this month, honoring our alumni and welcoming an honorary alumna into our fold. Receiving the Outstanding Alumnus Award was Marlin Andres ’76 for his efforts in building a small pipefitting business into six entities at two locations providing custom pipe and other metal fabrication, a blast and paint facility, and trucking and leasing. Now retired from leading the privately-owned Globe business over the past three decades, Andres continues to support Catholic education and Providence.

Andres is one of 12 children who grew up on the family farm in Starlight and one of 10 who graduated from Providence. His parents taught them the importance not only of their Catholic faith but the value of hard work. That work ethic guided him through his earning his bachelor’s degree in accounting from Indiana University Southeast while also working as a truck driver and as a pipefitter in Louisville.

When the company he was working for was sold, Andres recognized that the company culture and worker environment was changing, he said He and his brother decided to take a leap of faith and start their own pipefitting business in 1984. Armed with several years of practical experience, his accounting degree, and a willingness to work hard, the Andres brothers embarked on the challenge of building their business.

The business started off small with a limited number of employees. When the company lost a bid on a large job due to size constraints, Andres said he vowed that it would never happen again. He turned to his (now late) uncle Bob Koetter (Hon. ’01) to build a larger facility in downtown New Albany equipped to handle larger jobs. 

With the larger space, Globe Mechanical grew to include six distinct entities, including Globe LLC, Globe Industrial, Globe Industries, Andres Leasing, and Andres Trucking, with a second location in Pekin. The pipe and other metal fabrication businesses produce Globe products used across the United States as well as internationally. In addition to growing the Globe business, Andres also served as the president of the Mechanical Contractors Union for 15 years.

Andres is now enjoying retirement with his wife, Vicki, and his cousin Brian Kruer ’94 leads the business operations. His sons, Houston Andres ‘13 and Noah Andres ’15, now work in the family business.

Andres attributes the success of his business to “hard work and good people,” noting that without a reliable work force, the company could not succeed.

“You have to treat people right,” Andres said. “You got to learn to work with people and get along, and then they will work hard with you.” 

Andres also credits and is grateful to several good friends from the Providence community who are local business leaders and who have provided their support and insights whenever he encountered various business challenges.

He also is grateful for the Catholic education he received at Providence and is eager to help the school continue to provide the same for new generations.

“It was a big part of my foundation of learning, and we want to make sure that continues on for others,” Andres said.

Honorary Alumnus Award

Dr. Kathryn Jacobi has given 30 years of service to Providence as an English teacher since 1991 and received an Honorary Alumna Award in recognition of her time here. She has taught every class in the English Department since that time and has served as the chairperson for the Departments of English and Theology as well as the Academic Council. Jacobi also had the honor of receiving the Saint Theodora Guerin Excellence in Education Award from the Archdiocese of Indianapolis in 2010.

In addition to teaching, Jacobi has shared her time and talents with Providence in a variety of ways. She served for nearly 15 years as both the Spring Musical props director and as director of the former acting troupe The Christmas Capers, which performed for nursing homes and Deanery schools. Beyond her theatrical contributions, she spent numerous years serving as chaperone at school dances after football and basketball games as well as the annual Christmas dance. 

Jacobi has made another significant contribution of her time and talent to the Providence community as a long-standing adult leader of junior and senior retreat programs from 1991-2020. Her involvement was integral in the continued success and evolution of the program over the last three decades.

Being part of the Providence community and retreat programs has strengthened her own faith, Jacobi said, noting that she and her husband, the Hon. Jerry Jacobi ’73, are both lectors and sacristans at their parish, St. Augustine, in Jeffersonville.

“Being a part of this community has helped with my own faith,” Jacobi said. “At Providence High School we are Christ-centered. We are influenced daily by each other and our Catholic faith.” 

She also has enjoyed the friendships she has made with her fellow faculty.

“I’ve spent my life with these people and in this community,” Jacobi said. “It’s been fun to watch each other grow and go through the journeys of life.”

Pioneer Power Award of Excellence

The late John MacLeod ’55 has received the highest award bestowed by Providence on its members with the Pioneer Power Award of Excellence, posthumously. This award honors his excellence as a basketball coach at all levels of the game while also being a man committed to his family, his faith, and Catholic education.

Born in New Albany and raised in the former Holy Trinity parish, MacLeod was in the inaugural class at Providence. The younger of his two sisters, Margaret (MacLeod) Burke then graduated in 1959. As a Pioneer, he was a talented athlete who played baseball and basketball and ran track. An even greater gift was his ability to motivate his teammates with his boundless enthusiasm.

In A Pioneering Spirit by the late Charlie Jenkins ’57, a section on MacLeod relays an article that appeared in the News & Tribune in 2012 describing how MacLeod was actually cut from the basketball team his senior year by the late Pete Murphy. But when Murphy noticed the dearth of team spirit, he brought MacLeod back on the team, whose spunk, work ethic, and talent added to the team overall.

MacLeod’s hard work at Providence paid off when he went on to play all three sports and set a school record at Bellarmine University for earning 10 athletic letters while earning degrees in history and physical education. His coaching career started as a graduate assistant at Indiana State University, where he earned his master’s degree.

After grad school, MacLeod began his career as a teacher and basketball coach, first as an assistant at DeSales High School in Louisville and then back to Indiana for his first head coaching job at Smithville High School, where he also coached baseball and cross country. In 1965 and he went on to Indianapolis Cathedral High School as an assistant basketball coach and head baseball coach. He had his eyes on the next level of coaching and networked at coaches clinics, developing a relationship that would land him at the University of Oklahoma.

In 1967 he jumped from that assistant high school coaching job to head basketball coach at the University of Oklahoma at the recommendation of one of the coaches he’d networked with – and thanks to a stellar interview. In six years at the notably “football school,” MacLeod led the Sooners to a 90-69 record and stunned the professional basketball world by being picked up as the head coach for the Phoenix Suns in 1973.

He became one of the rare college-to-NBA coaches who succeeded at the pro level, going 579-543 in 11 seasons and becoming the franchise’s all-time winningest coach. In the 1975-76 he led the team to the NBA Finals but lost to the Boston Celtics in six games. He then went on to coach the Dallas Mavericks from 1987-89 and the New York Knicks midseason in 1990-91.

He returned to the college level in 1991, coaching back home in Indiana at the University of Notre Dame. He spent eight years at Notre Dame and garnered the Big East Coach of the Year award in 1997. MacLeod spent his final six years of coaching back in the NBA as an assistant coach with Phoenix, Denver, and Golden State. 

In his 24 years in the NBA (18 as head coach), his teams earned 707 career wins. Add his 286 career college victories in his 14 seasons as an NCAA Division I head basketball coach for 993 career victories across the professional and collegiate levels. MacLeod’s professional accolades include induction into the Indiana Basketball Hall of Fame, Arizona Sports Hall of Fame, and the Phoenix Suns Ring of Honor.

More importantly, MacLeod was known as a kind-hearted and caring man who treated everyone with respect, his son, Matt said. He was concerned with teaching his players about life lessons that extended beyond the court. He also was passionate about his Catholic faith and Catholic education, which his family attributes to his upbringing and foundation established at Holy Trinity School and Providence High School.

MacLeod passed away in April 2019 after a bout with Alzheimer’s. In addition to son Matt, MacLeod and wife Carol have a daughter, Kathleen, and five grandchildren, and the family resides in Phoenix. MacLeod’s sister Margaret and husband Larry ’58 accepted MacLeod’s award on behalf of the MacLeod family.

Community Service Award

Fr. Dan Atkins ’66 received the Community Service Award for his nearly 50 years serving the Archdiocese of Indianapolis, including The New Albany Deanery and Providence High School, for nearly 50 years. He taught English, speech, and theology at Providence for more than a decade before entering the seminary and serving as a parish priest and pastor in several parishes, as a high school chaplain, and as director of the St. Paul Catholic Center at Indiana University beginning in 1987.

Fr. Dan explored seminary out of high school before deciding that was not yet his path, he said. He then earned his English and philosophy degrees from Kansas State College of Pittsburg, Kan. Following graduation, he returned to Providence for an alumni musical theatre production of 1776. His plan was to continue using his musical talents with a traveling performing group until art teacher Ray Day ’57 and then-principal the late Bob Larkin (Hon. ’93) asked him to consider teaching at Providence. 

Fr. Dan accepted the offer, teaching from 1972-1984 and started the formative Senior Retreat Program which, to this day, is one of the hallmarks of the Providence experience. Fr. Dan then followed the call to enter the seminary and was ordained an archdiocesan priest in 1987. His service as a priest has come full circle as he followed the call of the Holy Spirit and the bishop.

As a priest, he learned that “your ministry cannot stop at the church door,” he said. “You have to go out and meet people to encounter them where they are.”

As a fairly new priest in Indianapolis, he spent five years as school chaplain at Roncalli High School Chaplain while serving several parishes in that Deanery. Now as a retired priest, he is chaplain coordinator at his alma mater and is typically the priest for today’s seniors as they attend the Christian Awakening Retreat he first brought to Providence nearly 50 years ago.

After Roncalli, he was director of the St. Paul Catholic Center at Indiana University for 10 years, where he led prayer services for the football team and has a football helmet to prove it, he said. At St. Paul, he counseled Matt Tucci as he discerned his priestly calling, and Fr. Matt, now pastor of the Catholic Community of Jeffersonville, oversees vocations for the New Albany Deanery while Fr. Dan is archdiocesan associate director of vocations.

Locally, Fr. Dan previously served as pastor of St. Joe Corydon, St. Peter, and Most Precious Blood parishes in Harrison County for five years and Holy Family Parish in New Albany for seven years before retiring from full-time ministry. In his retirement, Fr. Dan offers morning liturgy every Thursday at Providence during the school year, still serving his alma mater and the archdiocese. He said he is glad to continue giving back to the school were he received his foundation for ministry.

“If you want to be a good priest, you must come in with a sense of self-worth,” Fr. Dan said. “I was encouraged and built up during my time at Providence to give me that sense of self-worth.”

Thank you for reading the eVision. If you would like to receive the twice-monthly publication in your inbox, sign up here.

Fall musical is part of global production

Students in the Musical Theatre Production class have a unique performance opportunity next weekend, Nov. 11-12. This year’s fall musical is one that will literally be performed around the world.

The students are taking part in All Together Now! A Global Event Celebrating Local Theatre, a concert-style show prepared by Music Theatre International and offered free to organizations all across the world. Allowing theatre programs to present the show without any fees is an attempt to help local theatres draw audiences back, and the PHS Theatre Department is happy to be part of it, director Mrs. Ellen Holifield said.

“This is an effort to help theatres get back on their feet after the pandemic, and it is only available for one weekend,” Mrs. Holifield said. “It is happening in all 50 states and over 40 countries with more than 5,500 productions total. So, it is a fun project, a little different for us, but pretty awesome.”

The students are looking forward to being part of a global event as well. Sophomore Mary Furnish said she likes the feeling of solidarity with other performing artists around the world.

“It makes us feel united and connected,” Mary said. “You’re not alone in it. We’re building up a lot of love and strength around the world through this show.”

Senior Jack Kaiser likes that it draws attention back to public performances.

“It brings the whole nation together to make better theatre departments, so people can pursue their musical theatre dreams,” Jack said.

Mary said she also likes that the show is a compilation of many different musicals, giving the performers and the audience a lot of variety.

“It brings a lot of life and air into it,” Mary said.

Her favorite song is “Seize the Day” from Newsies, in which she is in the ensemble, especially because it starts out slow and then builds to a faster pace. She also likes when all the various melodies blend together into a single harmony.

“The range of voices makes one unique voice, and it’s very cool,” Mary said.

Junior Jackson Bettler said his favorite song is “Be Our Guest” from Beauty and the Beast for its choreography and style.

“It’s a fun song, and everyone gets involved in it,” Jackson said.

Jack said his favorite is “Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious” from Mary Poppins, in which he portrays Bert.

“The choreography is a lot of fun,” Jack said.

Junior Maddie Beeler, who portrays Mary Poppins in the number, agrees.

“There’s a lot of movement, and a lot going on,” Maddie said.

Maddie said audiences will enjoy the show not only for everything that’s going on on stage but also because it features so many different types of songs.

“The audience will like the variety that we have,” Maddie said. “It’s fast paced one moment and then a slow ballad the next. Plus the staging is different than for songs we normally do.”

All Together Now! showtimes are Friday, Nov. 12, and Saturday, Nov. 13, at 7 p.m. and Sunday, Nov. 14, at 2:00 p.m. in the Robinson Auditorium. Tickets are $5, and will be sold at the door. All proceeds from the tickets will support the Providence Performing Arts Department.

Thank you for reading the eVision. If you would like to receive the twice-monthly publication in your inbox, sign up here.
 

Acting skills go beyond the PHS stage

Our students’ talents often extend beyond our own stage or athletic court. Two juniors are proof of just that. Junior Ainsley Wilt is in a short film that recently won in three categories in the Louisville 48 Hour Film Project, and junior KB Merchant has been cast in Derby Dinner Playhouse’s production of A Christmas Story.

Ainsley is one of seven actors in the film For Your Consideration sponsored by K9K Productions. The coming-of-age film focuses on emotional recovery and students with disabilities. Ainsley plays a student with the learning disability dyslexia.

Being part of a film that was written, filmed, and edited in one weekend was exhausting but fun, she said. The screenwriter received the script requirements at 7 p.m. on Friday and wrote the script until 3 a.m. The cast arrived at Charlestown High School at 7 a.m. for filming and worked all day. The production crew spent the following day on the editing. 

Learning the film was selected as one of the finalists for the premiere screening and won the Audience, Best Writing, and Best Cinematography awards was even better.

“It felt great (to be part of it),” Ainsley said. “I was really excited I got to do it.”

Ainsley was invited to be part of the cast through a family friend whose daughter, Ryley Nicole, is a professional actress. Ainsley has some acting experience and modeling experience, but as far as film-making goes, she is more likely to be behind the camera rather than in front of it. She enjoys making her own movies using her GoPro camera and even created a promotional video for Mathes Pharmacy.

Ainsley does hope to do more acting in the future and is looking for a new acting agency to represent her, she said. In the meantime, she is looking forward to the possibility of the cast traveling to Los Angeles for the screening of the film.

Musical theatre student to perform at Derby Dinner

KB will portray Marjorie, a school yard kid, in the musical version of A Christmas Story. She has been in the cast of two previous children’s show productions at the Derby Dinner, but this is her first main stage production and is thrilled to be in one.

“I’ve been wanting to be on the main stage for a while, so getting the opportunity to be in it is really exciting,” KB said.

Working with professional actors on a main stage is much more intense than performing in a children’s show, especially the rehearsals, she said. She leaves school early to take part in the 12-hour sessions, which started last Monday and continue until Nov. 10. The show will run Nov. 10-Dec. 30.

But KB said she is friends with many of the actors and the production team at Derby Dinner thanks to being in other shows. She also knows many of the 22 young actors who make up the cast from other local theatre productions as well as previous Derby Dinner shows, so that makes working them even more enjoyable.

She also likes the show itself.

“It’s so fun,” KB said. “It’s a lot like the movie, but it’s a musical.”

Her favorite is the Wild West number, and she also enjoys the kick line featuring the iconic leg lamps.

The show has a dual cast, and she will be in 32 of 64 shows, with 11 child actors in each cast. She said it’s particularly fun seeing some of the young actors experience working at the dinner theatre for the first time. Many have not done theatre-in-the-round before, something she enjoys because staging is more flexible since the actors don’t have to face the front. Still, it does have its challenges, including watching out for errant chairs that may be in the aisles as they make their way on stage.

Even though it is hard work, KB said it almost doesn’t feel that way because she enjoys acting so much – but she does enjoy getting a paycheck.

“Getting paid to do something I love is just awesome,” KB said.

Thank you for reading the eVision. If you would like to receive the twice-monthly publication in your inbox, sign up here.
 

Gift from former art student comes full circle

Mr. Ray Day ’57 and Dan Bulleit ’74 hold the portrait of Mr. Day that will hang in the Ray Day Little Theatre lobby.

The connection between student and teacher doesn’t always end with the final exam of the school year. Former art teacher Ray Day ’57 is proof of that. He has stayed connected with many of his former students as well as those he directed in multiple spring musicals.

Mr. Day’s former student Dan Bulleit ’74 is one of those. Mr. Day followed Bulleit’s career as a graphic designer and illustrator and then as he made the commitment to working as an artist full time in 2015. Bulleit expressed his gratitude to his former teacher by painting an oil portrait of him in 2006 when Mr. Day was honored at a New Albany Rotary Community Toast and Benefit. More recently, Bulleit presented Mr. Day with another oil painting of Mr. Day and his late wife, Eileen, shorting after her passing.

Mr. Day is now donating that 2006 oil painting to Providence to hang near the box office of the Ray Day Little Theatre. Having the painting will help President Victor Beeler ’94 in his effort to post photos identifying the various named areas on campus, such as the Larkin Center and Murphy Stadium.

Mr. Day also is helping Bulleit to prepare for an upcoming art show. In his years as an artist, Bulleit has won multiple awards at various juried art shows. But in the last few years, he has struggled to paint as he has dealt with treatments for colon cancer.

Bulleit will hold a retrospective exhibit titled “Finding Home” at the New Albany Floyd County Public Library Nov. 12-16, with an opening reception 6:00-8:00 p.m. on Nov. 12. The exhibit will feature about 40 paintings on loan from Bulleit’s clients and about 20 that are for sale.

Bulleit has difficulty speaking and has asked Mr. Day to be his spokesperson regarding the exhibit and at the opening reception. Mr. Day readily agreed and is happy to help Bulleit express his gratitude to all who have supported him in the last few years in his cancer journey.

“This exhibit is rooted in his genuine desire to personally thank everyone for their constant prayers and support,” Mr. Day said for Bulleit. “Additionally, he wants to simply share his work – in person – with the people of Southern Indiana, his ‘Home’ community.”

Mr. Day said he is happy to see Bulleit’s work on display for classmates, friends, and family to enjoy and purchase. And he is pleased to “put a face with a name” by donating his portrait to Providence. A plaque will accompany the portrait and share Mr. Day’s contribution to Providence, which includes 34 years as an art teacher, founder of the Providence Players and Musical Theatre Program, five years as director of development, 10 years as webmaster, and his continued worked as resident volunteer historian and archivist.

As for Bulleit’s exhibit, Mr. Day finds it gratifying to help his former student no matter how long it has been since he taught him in the classroom. Mr. Day is simply happy Bulleit has found the strength to continue to create.

“It has been a long grueling journey, but he continues to survive because of his perpetual drive to conquer,” Mr. Day said. “He’s had a deep passion to continue painting.”

Thank you for reading the eVision. If you would like to receive the twice-monthly publication in your inbox, sign up here.
 

Children’s Show debuts this weekend

The freshman and sophomore Providence Players will present Junie B. Jones Is Not a Crook this weekend. This funny, heartwarming play has the heroine, kindergartener Junie B. Jones, dealing with the quandary and the consequences of keeping a pretty pen she found. The cast is excited for the opportunity and looking forward to presenting such a funny show.

Freshman Preston Kist plays Ricardo, the boyfriend of Junie B. Jones, the main character (played by sophomore Tessa Holifield). He said adults and children alike will enjoy the show because there are elements to which everyone can relate.

“It’s very colorful and bright, and it has a lot of humor that kids would relate to,” Preston said, adding that adults can appreciate what the adult characters go through in interacting with the kindergarten characters.

Sophomore Alex LaMaster agrees. He plays Handsome Warren, a new boy who becomes the subject of interest for Junie B. Jones and her friends.

“The little kids will enjoy the more childish aspects of the show, especially the loud noises and the relatable humor,” Alex said. “The parents will relate to the adult characters and have fun seeing both sides of what goes on in Junie B. Jones’ life.”

The cast also enjoys their characters. Sophomore Erin Popson plays the teacher, known only as Mrs., and she said she enjoys being able to interact with most of the other characters.

“I get to play off of them,” Erin said. “There’s so much personality to the entire thing. Every character is a stereotype, but everyone also has a character arch, and everyone tells a story.”

For sophomore Sawyer Elias, playing Grace, one of Junie B. Jones’ two best friends, is a chance to be like a kid again – and release her energy when she gets to rehearsals after school.

“My role is very active, so I get to run around people,” Sawyer said, adding that audiences will also like being taken back to their childhood.

“I think they’ll like the way we talk … like little kids,” Sawyer said. “It feels like you can become a kid again through the show.”

Show times are Saturday, Oct. 23 at 7 p.m., and Sunday, Oct. 24 at 2 p.m., in the Robinson Auditorium. Tickets are $5 and will be sold at the door. Seating is general admission, and audiences will be asked to socially distance.

Thank you for reading the eVision. If you would like to receive the twice-monthly publication in your inbox, sign up here.

Sports Spotlight: Football

This issue’s Sports Spotlight is on Football. Coach Daniel McDonald nominated his three team captains: seniors Craig Bratcher, Nathan Ross, and Roy Shrout. Coach McDonald said he chose the trio for their work ethic and how they represent Providence on and off the field.

“I am exceptionally proud of each one of them,” Coach McDonald said. “They are fine young men who are fantastic representatives of our program. They always model our program’s core values: character first, team before self, and relentless effort.”

Craig Bratcher, senior running back/lineman, fourth season; House of Faith, Wrestling, Track

Coach McDonald said: “Craig is a linebacker/running back. He is a tough, hard-nosed player and has been ‘Mr. Reliable’ for us. He always gives relentless effort.

Question: How did you get started playing football?
Craig Bratcher: I started football eight years ago because my friends played football, and I fell in love with the sport and kept playing.

Q: Coach said you always give relentless effort. What is your inspiration to give 110% to the team?
CB: The reason I go 110 percent is for my team and my teammates.

Q: What do you enjoy about playing football?
CB: My favorite thing about playing football is that everyone has your back on the team.
 
Q: What is your favorite school subject and why?
CB: My favorite subject is math because I’m good at it.
 
Q: What is a fun tradition the Football team does that you look forward to continuing?
CB: The tradition that I’m most excited about is the senior meal after Thursday practice.

Nathan Ross, senior offensive and defensive lineman, fourth season, House of Humility, Track & Field

Coach McDonald said: “Nathan has a great work ethic and leads by example.”

Question: How did you get started playing football?
Nathan Ross: What got me started playing football was from my dad and my interest in watching the sport. I have been playing for 10 years total

Q: Coach said you have a great work ethic and lead by example. Who is your role model in this type of leadership?
NR: A great role model that helps me lead and have a great work ethic is my dad. He has helped lead me my entire life and has always worked hard in his job and as a dad.

Q: What do you enjoy about Providence Football?
NR: What I enjoy about Providence Football is the energy the team has. We are a pretty young team in both coaching and in players; this allows a lot of energy to form in the locker room and when we play.

Q: What is your favorite school subject?
NR: My favorite school subject is most sciences because I have always found science of biology and of the earth very interesting.

Q: What is a fun tradition the Football team does that you look forward to continuing?|
NR: A fun tradition that we started this year is giving the No. 1 jersey to a teacher or staff member. This is to show our appreciation and support to the teachers and staff.

Roy Shrout, senior tight end and defensive end, fourth season, House of Spirit, Wrestling

Coach McDonald says: “Roy is a physical player who has worked very hard over the past two years to achieve his physical goals.”

Question: How did you get started playing football?
Roy Shrout: My mom really wanted to see me play football instead of basketball, and I quickly found my love for the sport.

Q: Coach said you have worked very hard over the last few years to achieve your physical goals. Why is this important to you and what type of commitment did it take?
RS: This is important to me because of the recognition I am getting for the hard work I have put in for the last few years. To get to where I am today, it took a lot of hard work and dedication to better myself academically and athletically. It was a big help that I had a lot of support and time that so many people have given to me.

Q: What are you looking forward to as you wrap up the regular season and start the postseason?
RS: I am looking forward to playing well as a team and making a good playoff run. I look forward to enjoying the last few games and practices with my friends and teammates.

Q: What do you enjoy about playing football in general?
RS: I enjoy the challenge, the fun, and the lessons that football has to offer. I enjoy the physicality of football and the fun it entails.

Q: What is a fun tradition the Football team does that you looked forward to continuing?
RS: I always looked forward to senior activities such as senior dinners, senior night, and homecoming assemblies. I enjoy the senior dinners and assemblies because it brings you and your teammates closer to make a strong group of leaders and friends for your senior year. I enjoy senior night because of the recognition for your parents. This night shows the team and the players’ appreciation for everything the parents do.

Thank you for reading the eVision. If you would like to receive the twice-monthly publication in your inbox, sign up here.

October Leaders help plan, lead their Houses

Students in the Houses of Integrity, Humility, and Faith were recognized as October Leaders for their efforts in planning, implementing those plans, and leading their houses.

From the House of Integrity:

Nick Stoner, freshman house leader, Football, Boys Basketball, Track

Question: What do you like about being a House leader?
Nick Stoner: The things I like about being a House delegate are helping with all of the activities we have planned and people looking up to me to be a leader.

Q: What has been your favorite House activity so far?
NS: My favorite House activity this year was Guerin Day.

Q: What is your favorite House memory?
NS: My favorite House memory is winning Guerin Day.

In what House activity have you been directly involved?
NS: I have been directly involved in going to morning Mass on Thursday and getting as many House members to attend as I can.

Alli Wade, sophomore House leader, freshman House leader 2019-2020, Girls Soccer

Question: What has been your favorite House activity so far?
Alli Wade: My favorite house activity has been Guerin Day.

Q: What is your favorite House memory?
AW: My favorite House memory is winning Guerin Day this year.

Q: What do you like about being a House leader?
AW: I like to always be a part in helping our House to victories.

Q: What House activity have you been directly involved in?
AW: I helped out at the Deanery Night Carnival, and I ran the photo booth.

Grace Purichia, junior House leader, sophomore House leader 2020-2021, freshman House leader 2019-2020, Volleyball

Question: What do you like about being a House leader?
Grace Purichia: I like being a House leader because I get to talk to my whole house, plan events, and enhance my leadership skills.

Q: What is your favorite House memory?
GP: My favorite House memory was winning Guerin Day this year because I got to make all the teams for our House and watch them all compete, and it was so fun to see Integrity win it all.

Q: What has been your favorite House activity so far?
GP: My favorite House activity has been the Angel Tree project.

Q: Who is your role model as a leader?
GP: My role model as a leader is my mom because she knows how to lead with confidence and organization .

Q: What did it mean to you for the House of Integrity to win Guerin Day this year, following up its 2019 win?
GP: It was awesome! We were so proud of ourselves, and it was so cool to be able to defend our title.

Ally Gray, senior house leader, junior House leader 2020-2021, sophomore House leader 2019-2020, freshman House leader 2018-2019, Girls Golf, Girls Tennis, Art Club, Student Ambassador, SEAC, National Honor Society

Question: What do you like about being a House leader?
Ally Gray: It makes me feel more connected to my House and school.

Q: What has been your favorite House activity so far?
AG: My favorite activity was the Angel Tree project we did my freshman year. It was nice to work together as a House to help people.

Q: What is your favorite House memory?
AG: Winning Guerin Day this year.

Q: In what ways does your House make Providence a better place?
AG: The House of Integrity works to organize different events for the school. We do service-based events as well as fun events like the bonfire we are having this year.

Q: What did it mean to you for the House of Integrity to win Guerin Day this year, following up its 2019 win?
AG: It meant a lot to win Guerin Day this year because it was the last Guerin Day for me. I know everyone in the house was really excited and tried really hard in all their events.

From the House of Humility:

Kennedy Campbell, sophomore

Question: What has been your favorite House activity so far?
Kennedy Campbell: My favorite House activity so far is Guerin Day. I loved being with my House playing games and having fun together.

Q: How have you helped lead your House?
KC: I have helped lead my House by helping make decisions about how or what we would do at events.

Q: What is your favorite House memory?
KC: My favorite House memory is Guerin Day. It was fun playing games as a House and hanging out with friends.

Q: In what ways does your House make Providence a better place?
KC: I think my House makes Providence a better place because everyone is kind and welcoming. We also can work together and get things done.

Ella Unruh, junior, Cheer, Theatre, Popcorn Players, songwriter, lead singer in local band

Question: What has been your favorite House activity so far?
Ella Unruh: My favorite House activity has been Guerin Day! It was a lot of fun to have everyone together and join in some fun!

Q: How have you helped lead your House?
EU: I’ve helped lead my House by participating and coming to each meeting and group activity with a positive attitude. I feel like positivity is very important and contagious as well!

Q: What is your favorite House memory?
EU: My favorite House memory is the talent show we had freshman year at Guerin Day and getting to perform for the school!

Q: In what ways does your House make Providence a better place?
EU: The House of Humility exemplifies the importance of being humble and kind. Here at Providence, those are two very important things to practice.

Q: Who is your role model as a leader?
EU: My role models as a leader would have to be my parents. I’ve always been raised by wonderful leaders themselves who challenge me to “make a difference.” I try my best to lead like they do and to make people happy.

Akhil Long, senior House leader, Cross Country, Track; cross-country cycling, world traveler
Leadership roles:  Led a group of cyclists across the country, multiple leadership roles in Boy Scouts
College plans: study aerospace engineering

Question: What do you like about being a House leader?
Akhil Long: I like helping with House activities.

Q: What has been your favorite House activity so far?
AL: My favorite House activity has been Guerin Day.

Q: In what ways does your House make Providence a better place?
AL: My House makes Providence a better place by organizing fundraisers for different organizations to better help improve life for other people.

Q: Who is your role model as a leader?
AL: My role model as a leader is Elon Musk.

From the House of Faith:

Margaux Heiligenberg, freshman House leader, JV Quick Recall, Drawing Club

Question: What do you like about being a House leader?
Margaux Heiligenberg: I am able to learn and grow in my leadership skills.

Q: What is your favorite House memory?
MH: My favorite House memory was participating with some of my fellow House members in the talent show.

Q: In what ways does your House make Providence a better place?
MH: The House of Faith brings strength to the Catholic community at Providence. We show compassion and kindness towards our school community.

Q: Who is your role model as a leader?
MH: My role model as a House leader is senior Sarah Boehm. She is involved heavily in the school, and she is the perfect example of what it means to be a great leader.

Kyle Netter, sophomore House leader, freshman House leader 2020-2021, Boys Basketball, Track, Quick Recall team

Question: What has been your favorite House activity so far?
Kyle Netter: My favorite house activity so far has been Guerin Day.

Q: What do you like about being a House leader?
KN: I like that I can lead by example and influence others to be enthusiastic about Blue Pride activities.

Q: In what ways does your House make Providence a better place?
KN: Our House makes Providence a better place because we can better our school by fundraisers, volunteer programs, and hosting student events.

Q: Who is your role model as a leader?
KN: My role model is Mr. Loner because he helps me become successful in being a role model to other students like he is to me.

Avery Miiller, junior House leader, sophomore House leader 2020-2021, freshman House leader 2019-2020, Girls Soccer, Girls Tennis, Green Dot Club, Honor Council, Student Ambassador

Question: What do you like about being a House leader?
Avery Miiller: I like the responsibility of being a House leader. My whole life I’ve been involving myself in school activities in order to challenge myself with the task of responsibility. It’s satisfying to be able to balance multiple responsibilities and tasks.

Q: What has been your favorite House activity so far?
AM: My favorite House activity has always been Guerin Day. It’s a great opportunity to bond with the other members of my House, and it’s a super fun event for everyone.

Q: What House activity have you been directly involved in?
AM: I was involved in the canned food drive that my House hosted.

Q: Who is your role model as a leader?
AM: My role model as a leader is Mr. Hutchins because he is always enthusiastic and in positive spirits. These are great qualities to have as a leader.

Sarah Boehm, senior House leader, junior House leader 2020-2021, sophomore House leader 2019-2020, freshman House leader 2018-2019, Swim, Cross Country, Track, Providence Singers, Popcorn Players, Theatre, Pinterest Club, Liturgical Minister, National Honor Society, Venture Crew
College plans: Attend U of L or Purdue for engineering

Question: What do you like about being a House leader?
SB: I like being a House leader because it has helped me meet everyone in my House, especially the freshmen who I might not otherwise know super well.

Q: What has been your favorite House activity so far?
SB: My favorite House activity is the bonfire we had a couple years ago

Q: What is your favorite House memory?
SB: My favorite House memory is playing “duck, duck, goose” during a House meeting and Tyrone pushing Daniel over on accident when it got a little out of hand.

Q: Who is your role model as a leader?
SB: My role model as a leader are my coaches, Coach Neal Masterson and Coach Jim Pfeiffer, who are very understanding and will push you to be your best without forcing you to do things you don’t want to do.

Thank you for reading the eVision. If you would like to receive the twice-monthly publication in your inbox, sign up here.
Back To Top
WordPress Appliance - Powered by TurnKey Linux